OPINION   
Editor's Note
20 years of service to the community
Time flies.

Exactly 20 years ago this month, The SUN shone for the Filipinos in Hong Kong. It was the fulfillment of a dream that took shape years earlier, or shortly after I arrived here in 1987 and realized there was no reliable information channel serving the community.

But turning that dream into reality proved to be difficult. Several people offered to fund the publication of a news-paper, but everyone wanted a business model different from what we had in mind. Details...

Anak Araw
Pagpapabaya
Nitong nakaraang buwan ay naging saksi tayo sa nangyari kay Manang Gloria Ortinez, ang OFW na biktima ng tanim-bala sa Manila airport. Halos buong araw kasi ay naglagi siya sa opisina ng The SUN, kasama ang mga naghatid sa kanya na sina Susan "Toots" Ople na tagataguyod ng mga OFW, at ang abogado niyang si Atty Spocky Farolan, kaya nasaksihan namin siya nang malapitan. Details...

Migrant's Forum
Nanay Gloria's journey to HK
President Benigno Simeon Aquino III recently told the media that cases of tanim-bala were sensationalized, citing figures to prove his point. As an OFW advocate, I respectfully disagree. Looking at this from a purely numbers perspective could lead one to overlook the deep trauma that such incidents have caused its innocent victims.

Had he met and spoken to 56-year old OFW Gloria Ortinez, our President would have learned the following: Details...

Know Your Rights
The Mission
This was the speech delivered by the Mission for Migrant Workers' general manager, Cynthia Tellez, at the launch of the 10-year Impact Evaluation Report of the Mission's work held on December 5, 2015 at the Li Hall of St. John's Cathedral. Details...

BUHAY PINAY   
Trapik!

See this month's stories...

NEWS FROM HOME   
No politics on poll-related cases: SC
With at least one -- and possibly two disqualification cases in the presidential race -- the Supreme Court has assured the nation politics will not dictate its decisions.
See this month's stories...

COMMUNITY   
Mission gets top approval rating from clients
Staff and volunteers at the Mission for Migrant Workers had reason to celebrate when they launched the non-government organization's 10-year Impact Evaluation Report at Li Hall of St John's Cathedral on Dec. 4. Nearly all, or 97% of migrants who sought assistance said that they were helped by the Mission, and more than half of them (57%) said they would recommend the NGO to others.
See this month's stories...

PINOY JOKES   
TV bloopers

See this month's stories...

Chinese Horoscope   
Ano ang hatid ng Disyembre sa iyo

See this month's stories...

Your Daily News   
  GMANews
  Phil. Daily Inquirer
  Manila Times

  May 2013 Hong Kong News   
Filipina appeals removal order to be with resident kid
A Filipina fighting to remain in Hong Kong to be with her underage daughter who holds permanent resident status here has elevated her battle to the Court of Appeal.

Milagros Tecson Comilang, a former domestic helper, has appealed a decision of the Court of First Instance rejecting her challenge to the Director of Immigration's repeated refusal to extend her permission to stay in the territory.

The Court of Appeal has reserved its judgment after hearing arguments on Apr. 16.

The lower court ruling, which was handed down in June last year, also denied Comilang's petition for a judicial review of the Commissioner of Registration's rejection of her application for a Hong Kong permanent identity card.

The outcome of the case could have serious implications for all Filipino children who have been granted right of abode, but whose parents do not share this status. Such is the case of about two dozen children of Filipino domestic workers who were granted permanent residency about three to four years ago.

At the appeal hearing, Comilang's counsel, Gladys Li, SC, described the legal proceeding before Justices Peter Cheung, Frank Stock and Joseph Paul Fok as a special case involving a child who is underage, a minority and who requires the constant presence of a parent.

Comilang first came to the city in 1997. Shortly after her last contract was terminated on July 13, 2005, she underwent an Islamic marriage with a certain Shaker Ahmed, a Hong Kong permanent resident. She subsequently applied for a change of her immigration status to remain in the city as a dependant of her husband.

Pending the processing of her application, the Director of Immigration did not extend Comilang's permission to stay, which expired on Oct. 10, 2005.

Then, in February 2006, the already overstaying Comilang gave birth to Zahrah Ahmed, who acquired permanent resident status through her father and by virtue of her being born in Hong Kong.

Ahmed, the husband, was subsequently discovered to be in a subsisting marriage at the time he married Comilang. He later withdrew his sponsorship of the Filipina's change of status application.

Since then, Comilang has resisted several orders for her leave so she could stay with her daughter, whom she wants to remain in the territory to enjoy her rights as a permanent resident. The child is a co-applicant in the case.

While recognizing the state's right to control who stays in Hong Kong, Li argued that the immigration department should allow a custodial parent the right to stay in the interest of the child.

The Court, warned Li, should consider the impact of their decision because, in compelling Comilang to leave, the child essentially loses her right of abode.

Li also questioned the fairness of allowing unmarried children below 18 years of age to be dependants of parents, and yet denying the same right to a resident child and her parent.

On the other hand, Anderson Shek, counsel for the Director of Immigration, wanted the Court to clarify what a child's right of abode entailed.

"To what extent can (the child's right of abode) be relied upon (by) the mother (who has) no right of abode?" asked Shek.

Foreign nationals are allowed to sponsor their relatives as dependants. In exceptional cases, the Director of Immigration also has the discretion to allow other foreign nationals to stay in Hong Kong on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

However, in the appealed 50-page judgment, Presiding Justice Johnson Lam had stated that the courts will not lightly interfere with the Director's exercise of discretion and that "humanitarian considerations are not reviewable in courts" (Lau Kong Yung vs Director Immigration [1999]).

Judge Lam also ruled that it was not necessary for the court to come to any conclusion on the impact of the refusal of Tecson's extension of stay on the future of Zahrah Ahmed.

He further rejected the argument that Comilang needed to leave Hong Kong with her daughter, simply because she had custody of the child.

"The Family Court has jurisdiction to reconsider the question of custody when (Comilang) has to leave Hong Kong. One option is to grant custody to the father. Another option is to grant leave to relocation. It is entirely a matter for the Family Court to decide in view of the prevailing circumstances and the best interest of the child," said Justice Lam.


Listen to:


View print version
of The Sun 1










Listahan ng kumpanyang nagbibigay ng serbisyo sa mga OFW sa Hong Kong

  4 www.sunweb.com | The SUN Internet Edition | All rights reserved